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Holly West Mokita Album review

Mokita

Album review by Allyson Kingsley Music Journalist with Boston Rock Radio

 

Holly West is a Dallas-based badass bassist that you may remember from Honey or Love Stricken Demise. She has branched out on her own project in collaboration with drummer Brady Blade and her own guitar hero Gary Hoey to self-release the EP Mokita.  The album has a  definitive punk vibe (aka Barb Wire Dolls style) and the rhythm is hard rockin old school style (aka The Runaways).

 

The song “Home" has catchy riffs and some passionate pipework; check out the blazing guitar solo midway. In the song “Mokita" you can hear Holly crunching on the bass and she kicks ass. She did a cover of  “When the Levee Breaks,” my personal Led Zeppelin favorite and it's actually fucking decent. As I've said in other reviews I am harsh when it comes to covers. She treads it smoothly and the instrumentation is spot on.

 

This is indeed a great little EP full of that punk flair I cherish.

 

https://www.facebook.com/hollywestmusic/

 

 https://youtu.be/1Cc746YHVig

 

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