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Articles Home » Music Talk » Hinder Interview with Marshal & Cody
Hinder Interview with Marshal & Cody

Hinder

Interview with Marshal & Cody

By:  Nina McCarthy,  Senior Music Journalist

Boston Rock Radio

 

 

Hinder is a multi platinum American rock band from Oklahoma that was formed in 2001.  The most recent lineup is:

 

Marshal Dutton – lead vocals

Joe "Blower" Garvey – lead guitar, backing vocals
Cody Hanson – drums
Mark King – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
Mike Rodden – bass, backing vocals

 

The band's latest release, their sixth full length studio album titled The Reign was released August 11, 2017 on The End Records and shows they are ready to keep pleasing the masses.

 

I had a chance to get to know Marshal and Cody during their recent tour and discuss Marshal as the current frontman as well as the new album.  Thank you to the TM Jimmy, Sean from Moving Mountains Management, and Leo from The End Records for making this possible.


BRR:  I'm not going to go way back, because any old school fan of Hinder, knows the history...but Marshal, in 2009 you began helping write and produce songs for the 2010 studio album “All American Nightmare.” When Austin left to pursue a solo career in 2013, how did you end up becoming the frontman?

 

MD:  The guys searched for someone for awhile…

 

CH:  We had a search. He was part of that search.

 

MD:  I was helping on the other side of things and we tried a bunch of people and nobody really worked out.  It was kind of last minute.

 

CH:  It was very last minute.  We were having a really hard time, not only on the performance side of getting somebody that would match up, but even more than that, it was on the personal side.  I think we got to the point where we were ready to go out and hit the road and we decided at that point in time we just wanted to be around family, people that we cared about and people that cared about us in return, somebody that really cared about our band and there was only one person.  It just made sense and probably the best decision we could have possibly made.

 

 

BRR:  When you first joined, did you find some people weren't accepting of you?

 

MD:  I was really scared thinking it was going to be tomatoes every night.  To my shock and delight, most people, like 90%,  were accepting and encouraging and stuff.  It really couldn't have gone better.  There's always going to be some people that are going to be haters and say hateful things, but it was pretty minimal considering, at least from my perspective.  Maybe I avoided a lot of it.

 

BRR:  I read a review and it was someone who apparently wasn't up on the latest and they said they wondered when Austin decided to do something different with his voice and he liked it and didn't realize it was you at first and he loved it.

 

MD:  Some people still call me by his name.  They don't even know, which is odd to me.  But like I said, most of the people that are aware still come out and still support are kind to me!

 

BRR:  Do you feel the music evolved at that time with the change? I know the current release is heavier, but I'll get into that later.

 

CH:   Yes, I would say so with Marshal’s multiple abilities.  I think it kind of took things to a different level musically.  I know fans are used to an old sound but people would be blown away if they could see behind the scenes of everything that Marshal brings to the table.  It's really, really impressive.

 

BRR:  The scene has changed so much since the beginning of Hinder.

 

MD:  As has the music industry, and not necessarily in a good way.

 

BRR:  Absolutely, that's even worse.. Although, I think rock is finally making a strong coming back!  Do you find it challenging to stay current yet stay true to your sound?

 

MD:  I think it's kind of difficult, especially for a band like us, that's in a situation where you want to have something competitive and rock, but at the same time, rock is kind of a closed market right now and not as big as it was.  We want to branch out of that, but it's hard to know who you are going to offend when you try.  As far as the way we write songs, we just write and they come out however they do.  I think we went a little targeted with this record though

 

CH:  When you're aware of your surroundings with other artists and things going on with radio, like you said earlier, this album is a little bit heavier, and that was intentional for that reason.  But like Marshal said, even at the same time when we are writing heavier material, we're still trying to keep melody and hooks in mind.  That's the kind of music we prefer and I don't know that we could ever get away from it.

 

BRR:  What do you think contributes to the continued success of the band?

 

CH:  We are all a very tight knit group and we're all on the same page.  We've built a very cool business and family here.  The fact that we all get along so well and are on the same page makes a big difference.

 

MD:  That's true.  There's no discordance in this band at all.  Everybody is friends and happy to be around each other.

 

BRR:  It would be hard to be on a bus together if not!  

 

CH:  A lot of bands suffer from that.  They don't get along and they fight.

 

MD:  We really don't, not anymore anyway.

 

BRR:  That's good! You seem like chill guys.  So, who were your major influences in your life, non musically?

 

CH:  That's easy, for me my dad was a huge influence.  My dad and older brother, there are a bunch of them, but my dad would be my main influence in my life.

 

BRR:  Was your family supportive of your career decision?

 

CH:  Definitely and they still are.  My parents came out and followed us in their RV for several shows and that was really neat.  My dad helps us out with building stage pieces and set designs and things like that.  So, everytime we need something, he's always there to help out and that's huge for us.

 

MD:  I was about to say the exact same thing, my dad was my major influence in life.  Other than that, musically, it's hard to think.  Obviously my mother too.  I had a loving supportive family and I came from a musical background.  My mom was in a singing group and all my uncles played guitar, so it was kind of natural and they encouraged it fortunately.

 

BRR:  When you finally hit it big, what was the 1st thing you bought that you couldn't afford before?  (Both hesitate).  Are you still trying to afford it?

 

MD:  I'm not really a spender.  I buy musical equipment.  The biggest thing I've ever spent money on is like $6,000 on equipment or a new studio rig or a new guitar or piano or something like that.  But, I've been driving the same car for years and years.

 

CH:  I keep trying to get him to get a new one and he just won't do it.  My first purchase actually was a new car and I bought land after that, so I've been fairly responsible for the most part.

 

BRR:  Which bands are you currently listening to?

 

CH:  The only newer band that I've heard in quite awhile that I actually enjoy is Wayland, the first band on this tour.  I'm really digging some of their songs and that's pretty rare for me.

 

BRR:  I interviewed them not too long ago.  It was supposed to be a year ago and the venue abruptly closed the day they were supposed to play there, so I caught up with them by phone.  We started playing them right away on Boston Rock Radio and I really enjoy them as well.

 

MD:  I've actually been listening to stuff like K Flay and I actually really like the new Kesha record, that's ironic, I know, but it's really cool.  I've been jamming out to it.

 

BRR:  Wow, that's not what I expected to hear, but she's actually really talented.

 

MD:  Honestly, I've been binge watching TV more than I've been doing anything else.

 

CH:  We're always doing so much.  We write and record other music besides Hinder stuff, so it's kind of nice to take a break from it and not focus on music for a minute.  If we were wrapped up in music 24/7, it would be harder to create it.

 

BRR:  In August, you released your 6th studio album, The Rein.  Can you give me some insight on the title?

 

 

CH:  It's obviously based on the song.  We typically, in the past, haven't been politically motivated, musically anyway.  We don't really get involved in that stuff.  It was inspired by some things we were seeing that we were displeased by.  More than anything, it's about people being ugly to each other. Especially now, more than ever, people are just heartless and terrible toward each other.

 

MD:  There's this reign of ugliness going on and we'd like to see it stop. I don't know what the solution is, but…

 

BRR:  We're all looking for it!   I read that the album was pretty much inspired by the rock n’ roll life and it's definitely darker and heavier.  What made you go in a little heavier direction?

 

CH:  I think it's just a natural progression.  We need to touch on some different subjects.  There's depression in the music industry, especially now it's getting to be pretty prominent, and we wanted to touch on that.  Naturally when you start writing and thinking about darker subjects, the music kind of follows that path.

 

MD:  That and the fact that listening to other music, it's gotten kind of heavier.  It's a challenge for a band to be creative and do what you want to do, but also stay current.  That's important as well, so it's things you have to think of.

 

BRR:  “Remember Me” hit me hard, especially with all the recent deaths of musicians and also the reality of our own mortality.  It's obviously about that emotional struggle so many of us suffer from, but can you elaborate a little more on that song and maybe a couple others?

 

CH:  The music industry will chew you up and spit you out.  A lot of people don't realize with all these deaths in the music world that the highs are really, really high and the lows are really, really low.  It's an emotional rollercoaster for sure and it can definitely be difficult to deal with.  

 

MD:  There are several songs on the record about suicide, especially that one.  Some people face that horrible idea.  We actually had a friend from Oklahoma City that was a musician that committed suicide and then seeing all the other people in the industry like Cornell, it was something on our minds and seemed like something that needed to be addressed.  That's where songs like “Remember Me” and “ Too Late” come from.

 

BRR:  It's sad and I think people look at musicians thinking you're living this glamorous life, but it's not. I hear from all the touring bands that being away from family and loved ones for sometimes months at a time is the hardest.

 

CH:  Especially now with bands being so accessible through social media.  It seems people's favorite thing to do is go online and be shitty and hateful.  You do your best to kind of ignore it and shrug it off, but you can only handle so much of people telling you how terrible you are and to go kill yourself.  It affects you.  It makes you feel as if the whole world is ugly even when it's not.

 

BRR:  I picture these people sitting at their computers and typing this horrible stuff and it's sad that they have no other life.

 

MD:  I don't get it. I you don't have anything nice to say, why are you wasting your time?

 

BRR:  Exactly.  Now, currently on an amazing tour lineup. You don't want to know what I went through with all the changes with scheduling, but I didn't want to miss this lineup or interview.  I was supposed to go to Providence, then Hampton Beach (NH), and here I am in CT finally.

 

MD:  We're glad you made it.  You made the right choice too because Hampton Beach was cold and rainy.

 

BRR:  Yes, but all my friends were there!  It was hard to find someone to come out with me to CT on a Sunday night.  So, how has the tour been going in general?

 

CH:  It's been going really great. We get along, especially with the Wayland guys.  We love those dudes.  They're a riot and really fun to be around.  Most of the shows have been good.  We've had a few low turnouts, but other than that, last night's show was killer.  It was a lot fun.  We've been having fun.  We're a little tired though.

 

BRR:  This is my fourth night out in a row and I was feeling bad for myself but then I was like, “ Wait, look at these guys!”  But I'm getting too old to be getting home at 3am.

 

CH:  It's our own fault because we drink too much.

 

MD:  The first part of the tour was actually more enjoyable for me because we weren't so far north and it wasn't so cold.  I'm so cold natured I can't even stand to leave the bus.

 

BRR:  I'm always warm, but it's the dampness that gets me.  It actually was nice a week or so before you came, figures, right?  Do you have any crazy stories from this tour you can share?

 

CH:  Not that we can share!  I feel like by the time things start getting crazy enough to develop a story, it's beyond the point of sharing.

 

BRR:  Ok, we'll leave it at that then.  Speaking of stories, I want to know how Joe got his nickname, Blower?

 

CH:  It has been so many years of so many stories that have morphed into things that I'm not even really sure at this point.  You might just have to ask him because I don't even remember.

 

BRR:  What can I expect to see from your live show tonight?

 

CH:  Hopefully it will be a lot of fun. We try to go up there and put as much energy into it as possible and leave it all on the stage and try to treat every show like a party, so hopefully just a good time.

 

MD:  That's all I want to see, that everyone is having a good time.  Get a drink, loosen up, have fun.  This is what we are here for.  We're drinkers. It's a social lubricant.

 

BRR:  To be honest, this is my 2nd in-person interview I've ever done fully sober.  Nonpoint was my first.  Not that I get trashed or can't do it sober, but I like to have one or two to ease the nerves and feel more relaxed because usually I'm rushing to get to where I'm going and connect with the correct people and it can be stressful.  But you guys make me feel comfortable so this is good.  But before I go inside and get that drink before the show starts, is there anything you'd like to add or say to your fans?

 

CH:  Thanks for sticking with us.  We've been doing this for a very long time and to have such a loyal fan base that shows up this many years later is definitely a blessing, so thanks.

 

MD:  Thanks for accepting me.  I'm happy to be here and I love to see everyone.  Thanks for coming out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos below taken at Wally’s Pub the night before courtesy of Trixie’s Tripod.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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